The guys talk with Skyler Irvine about how Arizona’s values, landscape and culture, for instance, come through digital, as well as his upcoming book, “Niche, Please!”

Contact: Mike mike@resoundcreative.com or Chris chris@resoundcreative.com

Discuss at https://www.facebook.com/azbrandcast/

The show is recorded at the Resound offices in ever-sunny Tempe, Arizona (the 48th – and best state of them all).

Show Transcript

Mike Jones:
This is the AZ Brandcast, where we explore Arizona’s brand and the brands that make Arizona. I’m Mike Jones.

Chris Stadler:
And I’m Chris Stadler.

Mike Jones:
Welcome to AZ Brandcast, where we talk to awesome people about the power of brand and how to build great brands in our remarkable state of Arizona. And today I’m super excited to have a long time friend and comrade in the media business, in terms of just producing media here in the Valley of the sun in Phoenix. This is Skyler Irvine from RenzlerMedia. Skyler is a prolific content producer. We were just talking about this before the show started. He is always producing content, podcasts, videos, all sorts of awesome stuff, both for himself and obviously for all of his clients at Renzler.

Mike Jones:
And I think the other thing that I’ve note with Skyler in particular, I’ve noticed over the years, Skyler’s just your aptitude for kind of seeing what’s going on from a marketing standpoint, in terms of technologies or trends, within how people are getting their messaging out in front of their audience. And then also of note, you have a book that either, did it just come out?

Skyler Irvine:
No, I mean-

Mike Jones:
[crosstalk 00:01:21]-

Skyler Irvine:
But first of all-

Mike Jones:
Okay.

Skyler Irvine:
… Chris, Mike, thanks for having me. No, book is not out yet.

Mike Jones:
Sweet.

Skyler Irvine:
We’re getting down to the final stages of it. As you could imagine, the COVID has been fun for everything, including virtual book writing and editing.

Mike Jones:
Yeah. No, and that’s awesome. So tell us a little bit about your book, just so we’ve got a heads up for our audience and maybe they can go check it out as soon as it’s out.

Skyler Irvine:
Well, not to deter your audience in the first five minutes of the podcast with a pitch. I mean, we’re writing this book with, trying to give everyone the tools, who’s running a business themselves, entrepreneurs, solopreneur, to give them the tools to understand everything that’s happening in the social media landscape and how to utilize it for their own business. And when the pandemic hit, in the middle of the book, wanted to re-pivot it to really give people the tools, if you’re 50 years old and you’re getting laid off or furloughed from a job that might not come back, you’ve got all these tools. You’ve got the skillset in the corporate world, and you feel like the world has passed you by, this is the book that I wanted to put to show you that all the skills that you’ve developed over the last decade, are actually more valuable than these young kids who are great at social media, but don’t have the business acumen.

Skyler Irvine:
And to give you an intro of, don’t be overwhelmed with all this social media. There’s always going to be a new platform out there, but it’s nothing new. It’s all happened before. Whether it’s from radio, going into television or television, having three channels and having a hundred channels, or the internet, or TikTok or Snapchat, you can break them down to just specific categories and play to your strengths. And it’s really just about targeting your audience. And if you want to start a business or a side hustle, this is to give you all of the tools that you would need to narrow your focus and grow your reach.

Skyler Irvine:
And because of that, it has delayed somewhat the book, but it’s been really important to get all of this stuff down and really create that guide for, I think a lot of people that might need it over the next couple of years, as we see a major shift in what I imagine is coming for our economy as a whole really.

Mike Jones:
Yeah. No, I mean, it was already building and then COVID hit, and now it’s skyrocketing. I’m just watching tons and tons of people, either by choice or not, leaving the corporate world, moving into contractor roles or starting their own freelancer or startup businesses. So I think what you’re doing Skyler is right on point for what people need, especially as they’re trying to navigate social media, which I think can be a black box for a lot of people.

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah, and-

Mike Jones:
So, that’s really cool.

Skyler Irvine:
… That’s a really powerful thing because of the business owners that I work with and companies I’ve worked with, I’m sure you can relate, but at the top, if the owner or the CEO, however big or small the company is, if he’s one of those people, or she’s one of those people that just hires their niece to do their social media and the niece knows nothing about business and their social media doesn’t … like one summer later, no one’s updating it anymore. And that person is just, “Social media doesn’t work for our business, or it doesn’t work for our industry or whatever happens to be.” Well, if that’s your attitude, it’s never going to work. It only works if you actually care and want to make it work. And you’d see through some of the hiccups that happened with anything you’re doing.

Skyler Irvine:
So even if you’re not someone that’s going to be doing it actively, I think the owner of the business, big or small still has to believe in it. So that way, the people that are running it have that support. They’re not being undermined. They’re not being under cut. And I see that over and over again. So it’s really trying to tackle those common mistakes early on. And even if you’re not going to be the one that’s uploading videos to TikTok, you still have to understand that this could be a major impact for our business longterm. Let’s give the people that are running these channels, the tools they need, and not look down on their role within the company, which strangely enough is a very common thing.

Mike Jones:
Yeah. No, I think that’s spot on man. So I don’t want to jump too far ahead because there’s so much more to unpack in that, but we’ll get there. Chris always interests with an awesome icebreaker question. So I’m going to let Chris … hand it over to Chris for that.

Chris Stadler:
Yes, we have an ice breaker as always. Today’s ice breaker is, what is the most weirdly niche, niche, however you pronounce it, and we’ll get to that, business you’ve ever seen? So most weirdly niche? Yeah, go ahead.

Skyler Irvine:
Well, I was going to say, this is a whole other topic because I have a book coming out called Niche, Please! And the huge debate is, how do you pronounce it? Do you say niche? Do you say niche? So at the very least that’s a good jumping off point.

Mike Jones:
With that book title, it has to be niche.

Chris Stadler:
Yeah.

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah, it works either way.

Chris Stadler:
Niche, Please!

Skyler Irvine:
And what’s even greater is finding your business niche or what we call the bizniche, gets really interesting. The most niche business I’ve ever seen-

Chris Stadler:
Our producer is cracking up right now. You can’t hear him.

Skyler Irvine:
We’ll get him miked up. I need the laugh track. Okay, perfect. Yeah, I don’t know. That’s a really good question. I’d have to spend more time on it. Great icebreaker question, but I mean-

Chris Stadler:
We can buy you some time-

Skyler Irvine:
Is this firsthand experience or anything I’ve ever come across?

Chris Stadler:
You just say anything you’ve seen, could be. In fact, I think Mike, I think you have one, right?

Mike Jones:
So I have one that I’ve actually personally been involved with. And that is a tee shirt brand that I started with a couple of friends, four or five years ago, created a brand called [Toughlee 00:06:52]. And it is American political history shirts, about American political history prior to 1940. So we didn’t do any modern history. And it’s geared specifically for history teachers-

Chris Stadler:
Who teach at Purdue University.

Mike Jones:
I think to date, we have not had a … because internet stalk our customers because we don’t have that many. And I’m like, “Who are you? How did you find us? And what’s your background?” All that stuff. But I think to date, I have found that almost, it’s somewhere like +90% of our customers are either history teachers, or a spouse or partner of a history teacher. Or a family member of a history teacher and they’re going to give it to their history teacher, family member as a gift. So I think we nailed the niche part. There’s a whole other question I’d love to get into it. Can you go to niche or niche?

Chris Stadler:
Yeah.

Mike Jones:
Because I think we might’ve … with our product. That’s the most bizarrely niche thing I’ve ever been personally involved with. I’m sure there’s some weird niche businesses that I’ve come across, but that was the thing that jumped in my head.

Chris Stadler:
So mine was a magazine called Parking Review. It’s a UK magazine about-

Mike Jones:
Parking.

Chris Stadler:
… Parking your car. So to be fair, it’s a UK magazine about setting up parking in municipalities. That’s just parking-

Mike Jones:
That’s so niche.

Chris Stadler:
It’s not like parking structures. It’s not like-

Mike Jones:
It’s actual active parking, systems.

Chris Stadler:
It’s just parking review. And they have their own awards, their own nerdy niche awards for parking-

Skyler Irvine:
Sounds like a Reddit thread just turned into a book or magazine.

Chris Stadler:
Yeah.

Skyler Irvine:
And I bet they have their celebrities and-

Mike Jones:
My goodness. That’s so awesome.

Skyler Irvine:
… Stuck out people who are huge in parking, who knows?

Mike Jones:
It’s like the long tail effect in complete, full color.

Chris Stadler:
Yeah, so it is.

Mike Jones:
There’s a market for everything.

Chris Stadler:
So that’s mine.

Skyler Irvine:
A good one that jumps out that’s on the bigger scale, when Elon Musk launched The Boring Company, there was no competition. There was four machines globally. And the reason that a lot of tunnels weren’t getting built is, it just weren’t a lot of a supply of these machines. So he ended up building his own and started The Boring Company so he could dig his own tunnels and then lease it out to other people. So from day one, there’s a huge demand and not a lot of competition for just boring these giant holes, in underneath Vegas or underneath Los Angeles.

Skyler Irvine:
And that one stands out as far as on a huge scale. I was assuming you guys have come across or read Small Giants. I feel like that entire book is based on niche companies that found a market and decided not to expand. I mean, a lot of huge companies start out with their own niche and then eventually pivot and expand and take off. I mean, Netflix was built upon being no late fees on DVD rentals, which is the biggest moneymaker that blockbuster had at the time. And the reason they didn’t survive is because they solved the one problem that blockbuster was causing.

Skyler Irvine:
And blockbusters couldn’t accommodate or adjust to it in time. And now Netflix is nothing to do with DVD rentals. It’s something that they maintain as more of a nostalgia product than anything. It’s a fraction of what they make and they’ve pivoted and turned into a global cable channel. But it began as a niche. And I think most big companies today, whether it’s Lululemon or Under Armour, which started with compression shirts underneath football pads, and now has all the four major sports and endorsed athletes, competing with Nike. They didn’t do that from day one. They started as a product. So I think if you trace back a lot of the big companies, they all started as a niche and decided to keep going or try to keep going. And others like Small Giants, I think is a great example of people that just said, “No, we don’t want to get bigger. Let’s stay this size and just do more with it.”

Mike Jones:
Yeah. I think those are great examples.

Chris Stadler:
So here’s the question of the day though.

Mike Jones:
Yeah. The real question-

Chris Stadler:
The real question-

Mike Jones:
The heart of the issue.

Chris Stadler:
The most substantial part of this podcast probably, how do you pronounce N-I-C-H-E?

Skyler Irvine:
I think the official way from the root word, is niche. And America doing what we do in America, we make things our own. We drive on the side of the road that we want to, we have Fahrenheit, we have miles, we don’t do metric. And we say niche.

Mike Jones:
Yeah, I can buy that. I mean, it’s French, so you’re supposed to pronounce it niche, but we’re not French. So …

Chris Stadler:
Yeah. Does this sound like-

Mike Jones:
And we love to bastardize other countries, other languages, so it fits.

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah, I don’t know. I think niche sounds a little snooty.

Chris Stadler:
I just think we have to decide and then just go. How do you pronounce it? For me it’s niche.

Mike Jones:
I’ve always said niche. Yeah.

Chris Stadler:
N-I-T-C-H. And now confirmed by Skyler’s book title, Niche, Please!

Mike Jones:
Yeah.

Chris Stadler:
That’s just put me over the edge. Put me over there.

Skyler Irvine:
For this podcast, I will differ, I will say niche.

Chris Stadler:
So-

Skyler Irvine:
But I do prefer niche.

Chris Stadler:
So, we had a couple of questions. And I think one of the … I like this one, talking about video. So Skyler, you do a lot of video. And this goes right to Arizona, right? So right now we’re in kind of a crazy time, right? Things are changing, Mike, you said there’s a little revolution going on. And a lot of things are changing. We probably don’t know at all, what is changing, but there’s now a huge opportunity perhaps to use branded imagery, branded videos in social. And so, you might’ve given that a little bit of thought, maybe in the shower, maybe in the middle of the night, you wake up like, “Hey, social video.” How does Arizona enrich the visual representation of itself? Arizona companies, Arizona itself, perhaps using branded imagery and video?

Skyler Irvine:
I mean, that’s a good question. You could go out a lot of different directions. To me, I’ve always appreciated video because of how much you can get across to the consumer quickly. As someone who’s always loved to write, and I was writing for a long time and doing blog posts and was doing a lot of social media content when I didn’t really know what I was in the marketing industry, but I was in real estate. And my best writing that would get tons of views, didn’t really do much for me. Whereas with the first time I started doing video, it was, people would recognize me or say, “I saw your video.” Or say, “I saw your video, months later.” And they remembered it.

Skyler Irvine:
And I realized that a minute of video, could just say so much more about me than years of writing could, where you could read my writing, but not know much about me. And if you’re in a business that involves relationships and selling, and getting people to know you, the fastest way you can do that is through video. As someone who creates a lot of social media content, I mean, everything I’ve looked at is either supplier demand or efficiency. We’re busy. We don’t have all the money in the world. We don’t have all the time in the world.

Skyler Irvine:
We have scarce amount of resources. How can you get a maximum return on what you have? Well, if I film something, I can turn that into a video, a long video, a podcast of audio, a clip of a screenshot photo. I can transcribe it into audio. So efficiently, resource wise video allows you to do a lot of those things. But video is not easy, it’s hard, but it’s getting easier and cheaper to do. So video makes a ton of sense. If we’re trying to brand imagery or brand Arizona or an Arizona business, having some of the consistent visuals and aspects in our strategy with video, is definitely going to have more of a faster result than it would trying to do it non visually. Trying to do it with an audio tag, or a call sign at the end of your emails, at the end of your posts.

Skyler Irvine:
It’s tougher to do than with the visual, because visual, if you put out a YouTube video, some people listen to podcasts on YouTube, just on a Chrome tab. Some people will just read the transcript later or just want to get a summary, or some people will watch the whole thing. Other types of content, you have to pick and choose. If you’re not paying attention to a podcast you’re listening to, you’re not getting anything out of it rather than, even if you see it pop up on your screen. So if you’re posting basically, if you’re doing this podcast, for example, and you’re doing it every single week and you’re doing it as a live stream on Facebook, people might not even watch the live stream on Facebook, but six months later, they’ve seen it pop up enough on their own Facebook feed.

Skyler Irvine:
They’ve seen your faces. They’ve seen what you’re talking about. And even without actively consuming it, they think, “Okay, AZ Brandcast are always doing podcasts, are always talking about branding. Even though I’m not even paying attention to it, they’ve created some brand recognition in my mind.” And that’s, most companies are spending a ton of money doing that very inefficiently. And right now, there’s a moment in time where you can do it at a low cost with video and social media.

Chris Stadler:
So, talk a little more about the information. So you mentioned information is pretty dense in a one minute video. I’m a customer of a company, right? What is video? How does video change and inform how I interact with a company? Does it make it easier? Does it make me more comfortable? Does it make me … what does it do for me, that shortens, that reduces that barrier for me to actually contact the company or do business with that company?

Skyler Irvine:
So it depends if it’s, are you a customer or someone that you’re actively seeking? Or are you someone who wants you to discover it? You’re like, “That’s interesting.” Is that a problem that you need to solve? Where like today, I bought something on Instagram, off an Instagram ad that says, “Are bicycles taking up too much space in your garage?” And then it showed someone click a bicycle really easily into their wall. And it was a piece that you just installed on the wall. And they showed all of this to me in 15 seconds. And I was like, “We need this. I’m buying it.” Because it showed me my problem and solution in 15 seconds, it didn’t even take the whole minute. That is a really great way to sell a specific product. It didn’t have to play into my emotions.

Skyler Irvine:
It didn’t tell a story. It was, here’s a problem that you might have. If you do, here’s your solution for it. And if it doesn’t cost more than what I want to pay, that makes a lot of sense to me. And that really worked. If I’m a client of a company and I follow them on Instagram, and everyone is on lockdown, we don’t know what’s going on. But all of a sudden I come across their video and it’s a selfie video of the owner of the company saying, “Hey, we’re opening back up. Here are our social distancing protocols.” And they’re walking through their office saying, “Okay, we’ve moved this stuff over here. You might recognize this, this area is closed off. But if you come in, we’re taking it seriously. And here’s the mask, if you don’t bring your own and we’re washing our hands. And if you have any questions, let us know.”

Skyler Irvine:
And that’s really easy to do. Anyone could do that. And that’s honestly a video that everyone should be doing right now. Because it’s easy and it’s impactful. And that’s something that, if you’re a client or their customer or you’re thinking about whether or not they’re open or I’m not sure, or your friend, “Talk to you later. Man, I’ve been waiting to do this again. I don’t know if they’re open.” And you’re saying, “No, they are open. I saw their video.” You don’t know what the immediate return on that. If it’s a longterm return or short term return, or trying to get a brand message across. But some things don’t need to be completely overproduced or over-thought, where social media gives you a lot of opportunities to just put out videos that can make an impact without being part of an overall huge brand strategy, with consistent imagery and production.

Chris Stadler:
Sam and I were just talking about that. We were just talking about how there are different reasons you want to use video. And so it’s interesting. The connection, one of the things was for … because we do a lot of B2B, right? And so in B2B, it’s a little more technical sometimes. So there’s a little more science, a little more technology in it. There’s also, sometimes people don’t know how to buy, right? They don’t know how to buy it for me. They don’t know exactly how that process works because B2B-

Mike Jones:
Is a more complicated process, sales process.

Chris Stadler:
Yeah, totally.

Mike Jones:
Customer journey.

Chris Stadler:
Totally.

Mike Jones:
I think it goes back to these core fundamentals of marketing, how close can you get the customer to your product before they actually buy? Right?

Chris Stadler:
Yeah.

Mike Jones:
And then how close can you get them to a relationship with a human being or what feels like a human being, before they buy, right?

Chris Stadler:
Yeah.

Mike Jones:
We want trust, right? When we’re looking to purchase something, we want to trust it’s going to solve my problem. Just like you said, Skyler, that ad on Instagram, Instagram ad that you were talking about, was perfect case study. And your story can be as simple as you as a customer have a problem. We have a solution for you. Let’s show you how we do it.

Skyler Irvine:
Here’s exactly what it looks like in 10 seconds-

Mike Jones:
Yeah, and video just like we talked about. I mean, Skyler, you’ve been saying it all the time. It’s so fast. Right?

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah.

Mike Jones:
You can visually show it. You can tell it, you can put a little bit of some personality behind it in a really interesting way, both through your visuals and through music or whatever you decide to put in there, especially on the ad side. But even like you talked about that example, of somebody who’s an owner, who’s going to reopen their office or their shop, or whatever they’re doing, whatever their business is, it’s like reopen. Well, I get to see and interact with that CEO or that owner, or that founder or partner or whatever their title is. Right? But they’re the head honcho. And we get to build a relationship. And what’s really cool is that, super efficient on the brand side. Right? Imagine that CEO trying to develop one on one relationships with every customer, and sending personal emails to everybody saying, “Hey, we’re going to reopen. Here’s my reopening process letter-

Skyler Irvine:
Well, that-

Mike Jones:
And it’s 18 paragraphs.

Skyler Irvine:
And how many emails have you gotten that says that?

Mike Jones:
Yeah, right.

Skyler Irvine:
I get all these emails, right?

Mike Jones:
Yeah.

Skyler Irvine:
Like something I bought nine years ago is sending us, “In these tough times. Here’s our COVID-19 strategy.” I was like, “Who is this company?”

Chris Stadler:
Or, “We’re here for you.”

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah. You haven’t been here for me for three years, but now you are.

Mike Jones:
And now you’re not really doing anything special. You just want to sell me.

Skyler Irvine:
That’s great examples.

Chris Stadler:
So in my mind you talked about three things. So you talked about the ease of use of the product, which we talked about, like boom, clicks into your wall. Second thing is, how do I interact with you? So we’re talking about how do I buy the product, right? And so the restaurant owner talking about, “Here’s what it looks like. Here’s what we’re doing.” All of a sudden I feel like, “Okay.” So I’m not going to get there and be surprised every time I turn around until I sit down at the table and take my time and finally figure how to be here. Right?

Chris Stadler:
But then you mentioned something that’s interesting. And that’s I think, something that a lot of times we overlook, which is, do I even like this company or not? I see their website, there’s some cool stuff, maybe they have going, maybe they have … they’re writing some stuff. They sound like they might be all right. They have a product I want, but who do I like? And who am I most likely to reach out to, as a customer? Like I said, we do B2B. So a lot of times, I mean, we have one customer who they make videos and they have one salesperson who introduces everything. Right?

Skyler Irvine:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris Stadler:
She talks about it and you’re like, “Okay. I want to call her because she seems cool. And I’m not going to call and someone’s going to be difficult.” There are enough people out there. I just want to call someone-

Mike Jones:
Hopefully that’s true. Right? When you see the video and you’re interacting with … you’re seeing someone representing the brand, is that experience going to carry through? I’m getting a little off topic, but-

Skyler Irvine:
That happened been big time. So when I was in real estate and real estate is really competitive. I mean, everyone’s kind of doing the same thing just a little bit differently. And I got into this point where we had a really good Yelp presence and we would get these Yelp calls to go pitch ourselves for a listing appointment. And over enough time we realized, “Okay, we’re pretty much competing with the same two other people because we all have a pretty decent, similar Yelp.” So when someone on Yelp is calling us, they’re calling all three of us. And basically we’re getting a third of the closings. And we could spend a ton of time trying to get more of those closings and go from 33% to 40%, which is a lot of extra work. Or we could just try and reach more people. And what I found was, because you’re just one of three, you’re not really standing out.

Skyler Irvine:
You’re limited to what you are on Yelp. And when we started doing more video and putting out video content, that is just kind of us doing things, we got less listing appointment calls, but everyone that called us was calling us just to hire us, not to pitch them. And if you don’t have to waste your time pitching, that is a game changer for any business. And it was because, when you sit down in front of someone, they know whether or not they want to work with you for whatever reason. So it’s more of a personality thing than a technical thing. With video, you filter that through. So you might lose some potential people that would have just not hired you later.

Mike Jones:
[crosstalk 00:24:36].

Skyler Irvine:
It’s a huge time saver. Absolutely. And then when everyone’s calling you just to hire you, because they already understand who you are and what you stand for and what it would be like to work for you, that changes your sales process.

Chris Stadler:
Yeah.

Mike Jones:
I mean, you’re essentially short-cutting the sales process, right? So instead of like, “All right, we’re going to have some kind of digital exchange or a phone call, or an email exchange, and then I’m going to come and pitch to you or you’re going to come into some seminar and I’m going to pitch to you in real life.” And that’s a huge amount of time for very little volume. And then you’re going to make some decision, yes or no. Right? And instead if it’s like, we can deliver a lot of that same experience in a single video. Right? Produce it once, put it out there, make sure it’s in the right flow. It’s got the right messaging, but now, like you just said, now when they’re picking up the phone, it’s not about, “I’m here to kick the tire.” Right?

Mike Jones:
I’m here to actually get in the car and drive off the lot. And that I think is huge. And that’s just I think, a fundamental of digital, right? That I think a lot of companies are just starting to figure out, it’s like you can shortcut so much of this traditional sales process that you’ve had. We see that all the time with manufacturing companies who are very traditional in their sales process, it’s all one to one relationship building with their sales teams. And it’s like, there’s so much opportunity with digital marketing and digital communications, to just get a lot further down that road without having to tie up a salesperson.

Chris Stadler:
Yeah. As much one to many as you can to get them in. Right? Because that’s cheapest. And then you have your man hours focused on the … One other thing that I thought was really interesting, you were talking about the efficiency of video. So sounded like what you said was that you make a video and then you’re able to use that same content in a bunch of different ways. Is that what you said?

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah.

Chris Stadler:
Can you talk about that just a little bit?

Skyler Irvine:
I always think of it like, let’s say you’ve got 100 units of energy to make a podcast. Well, it would cost five more points to film that. You’re already sitting down for an hour, talking to record the audio. While turning on a camera isn’t that much more work, it’s more, but it’s not twice as much more. It’s just a little bit more, but that little bit more could have twice as much benefit. So if you’re looking at it, “Okay, this is our pillar of content. This podcast, we’ve got a lot of good content out of this. It gets us an hour of time.” Well, that hour of time could be chopped up into a month’s worth of content. Because what I found when I was starting my podcast, I didn’t need to reach everyone. I needed to reach downtown Phoenix business owners. So it was more important for me to reach them where they were instead of try to teach them how to download a podcast.

Skyler Irvine:
Or if I wanted my mom to listen to my podcast, it was easier for me to put it on YouTube and send her a link than to say, “Okay, download this app on your phone and then subscribe to it here.” Because we all deal with that. It makes sense. I want high podcast numbers, but really it’s about reaching the people where they are. So taking your podcast, which is great. And then putting authentic native content on additional platforms to reach people where they’re spending their time. So you can’t really upload an hour long podcast link to Instagram, but you could take a screenshot with a highlight quote, and then maybe a summary of something and post that as a photo on Instagram, that might take a little bit more work, but it could yield a whole new audience that didn’t know your podcast existed before.

Skyler Irvine:
Now we’ve got to the point where there’s a lot of cross sharing on platforms, but two years ago, three years ago that wasn’t that big of a thing. That’s my viewpoint with everything. If you’re going to put in all of this work to do it, adding just a little bit more, has a lot of value. But I’m a big believer in not being overwhelmed from day one where if it’s your first podcast, don’t try to do it all at once. Focus on making a really good podcast, because that’s the core of everything. If it’s not a good podcast, it doesn’t matter how many people you’re reaching. But if your podcast is great and you’ve figured that out, because as you know, you get used to it, you get better and it improves, you find your flow.

Skyler Irvine:
And then now your audio production is a little bit better. And you keep adding things as you go. And now you can experiment with stuff where, “All right, should we be on TikTok? I don’t know. Well, let’s just make a TikTok story out of our best podcast ever.” It gets easier the more you’ve done, because you can say, “Okay, let’s just take our 10 best episodes and repurpose that into blog posts.” And now we’re finding people that are searching Google, are finding our blog and now can listen to our podcasts where it didn’t exist before. And it’s really just kind of, the more you do, the easier it gets because the market tells you what’s working.

Skyler Irvine:
If everyone’s responding to one type of content, repurposing that content to reach more people in additional platforms, is really, really huge. And it doesn’t take that much more work compared to the companies that have $50000 to spend on one video, that they’re going to promote on their website for the next two years. It’s way better to make a thousand dollar videos and make 50 of them and post them every single week. That’s a no brainer to me, but it’s a really difficult conversation to have with a lot of people who just aren’t used to that type of quantity of content.

Chris Stadler:
Well, and I’m wondering too, if it’s not like, as you were talking Skyler, I was like, “I wonder if this is a client hack where …” I mean, how hard is it to get a client to give you content, right? Salespeople or people who are used to being in front of people, they want to talk. Right?

Skyler Irvine:
Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Chris Stadler:
And so, we’ve tried this before, trying to get people. If we can get people on video, ask them some questions, get them talking about interesting stuff. I mean, usually there are very interesting people who really know their market and who I think a lot of people would probably listen to. Now, all of a sudden, if you created a podcast, you had some good questions. Even now, right Skyler? I mean, we could write, we might be able to write three or four blog posts, if that was our model off of this conversation, we would just say each of these questions that we’ve written down in the discussion guide. And then we would just write-

Skyler Irvine:
I mean-

Chris Stadler:
[crosstalk 00:30:52]-

Skyler Irvine:
… I look at that three or four blog posts and 50 tweets and LinkedIn posts. And I mean, a lot of stuff and you nail it on the head, especially when we work with a lot of business owners or some big changes when you turn on the camera. And people are trying to create a video in their mind of how they think a video should work. So it’s hard to get authentic stuff from them, when authenticity is so crucial with these types of content. But a podcast format is great because it’s Q&A. And you get someone to talk about their business and anyone, whether they’re an introvert or an extrovert, if they love their business and they’re passionate about it, you can just capture that on camera or on audio, and then turn that into authentic sounding content, authentic looking content. And that’s extremely valuable.

Skyler Irvine:
And if you’re a business owner, I mean, every industry should have a podcast. I mean, you look at all these industries that hold these huge conferences that someone started 15 years ago, and now it’s its own business. Or then there’s a newsletter or there’s a quarterly magazine. There should be a podcast for all of these. There should be a YouTube channel for all of these. Or if you’re running a big company and you’re sending out emails or memos that update the company, its staff on what everything’s doing, that could also be a five minute podcast where they’re listening to it on their way to work. And instead of having it be another email that they have. So, changing the viewpoint of how all of these things could work for your business, big or small, I think is another thing that we’re starting to embrace more of.

Skyler Irvine:
And the last thing I would add with the video content specifically, it’s like right now is the best equalizer for big business or small business. Because everyone’s on a Zoom call right now. And now it doesn’t matter how nice your camera is, or how much your editing stuff is. You can do really valuable stuff at a low cost, at a very low barrier of entry. And if you’re not capitally liaising on it right now, it’s a real bummer because a lot of people are making some big headway just by turning their computer camera on, it’s pretty powerful.

Mike Jones:
And I think the expectations are low right now. Right? A lot of people, they’re comfortable and they’re accepting of a Zoom quality video. Right?

Chris Stadler:
I’d just assume you don’t have pants on. Right? It’s Zoom.

Mike Jones:
It’s a good thing I wore them today. But, yeah. I mean, the expectations are low. So I think you can get away with a lot. I totally agree Skyler, everything is-

Skyler Irvine:
I mean, especially now, because it takes reps. I mean, go to Joe Rogan’s first podcast ever. It doesn’t sound anything like it does today. It takes reps, it takes getting used to. So doing it now is a great chance to get your reps in because you’re going to be so much better at whatever it is you’re doing, a hundred episodes later. And now it’s just an opportunistic time to do it that I think most people will regret after the fact, I’m not taking advantage of it because the quality of it, I think is going to catch up really, really quickly. I mean the next round of iPad or the next round of laptops is just minimum 10 ADP cameras. And now Zoom background with green screens, and now everyone’s buying new lights, and this moment of low quality production is a flash in the pan.

Skyler Irvine:
And it’s going to go back to where people are starting to get distracted about the things that don’t matter as much. Where, a storyteller, we talked about it earlier, is everything or good content rather … I mean, the video I talked about on Instagram that sold me, it was shot on an iPhone. And it was in someone’s garage with terrible lighting because that didn’t matter to me. It was just showing me the product that solved a problem that we have. We have three kids, we have a bunch of bicycles everywhere and it just takes up a ton of space. Cool, this solved it. I don’t need storytelling. I don’t need a history of the company or what their global mission is. It was showing me the product that was solving a problem for me. Other companies like that might not work for them.

Mike Jones:
Yeah. Their story might be a little more complicated, but yeah.

Chris Stadler:
So, how does this kind of thing, because we talked about how this works for brands, for companies, can video work for a whole state? Like I don’t know, Arizona?

Mike Jones:
The video state?

Chris Stadler:
Yeah. How can Arizona, if possible leverage video photography?

Mike Jones:
I don’t want to steal the show. I don’t know, Skyler if you’ve got thoughts.

Skyler Irvine:
[crosstalk 00:35:21]. Yeah.

Mike Jones:
Yeah.

Skyler Irvine:
Well, I mean-

Mike Jones:
I mean, go ahead.

Skyler Irvine:
Does Arizona have a brand? I mean, does Arizona agree on anything? I mean, it’s hard to get one united thing for something that’s that large, right now, in my opinion. So that’s what I mean. But whatever it happened to be, yeah. There’s a lot of ways to capitalize on that. Especially with, I mean, Arizona’s got some wonderful accounts on every channel that I’ve found, of great photography, great videos of just showcasing all of the unique features that Arizona has to offer, that most people don’t realize that we’ve got more climate zones than any other state in the world. And you can go skiing and you can go on a lake and you could go in the desert, all in one day, it’s pretty incredible. As far as a brand mission, it’s like, man, I just feel like there’s so much division right now that finding any uniting factor about anything, seems to just stir up 40% of the population to just disagree with that flat out. So, it’s definitely a bold vision that I’d like to see happen for sure.

Mike Jones:
Yeah. That was some of the genesis of our podcast, was trying to uncover, is there a brand identity for Arizona? Not from a government standpoint, but more from this community of communities, right? That’s what Arizona is. It’s all these different regions, and towns and cities, and different groups of people within each of those locations. And yet there’s I think some underlying … is it 100% unifying? No, probably not. But I think there’s some underlying threads and we’ve found those over the last three years as we’ve talked with a lot of business leaders, having conversations like this around their experience with Arizona. And I know we keep coming back to a couple of them, obviously there’s some really basic attributes that everyone comes back to.

Mike Jones:
It’s like the wide open sky feel, Arizona is a super sunshiny state. So from a geography and weather standpoint, you get some obvious stuff. And then there’s some industries that are a little bit more hot here than others. But the other thing that we keep coming back to is just, there’s an underlying … and again, it’s not 100%, but the majority or a lot of people in Arizona really value freedom, they really value being able to do what they want. Right? Like, if I’m going to get up on a Saturday morning, I want to go out and go take a bike ride and I can do that. Right? The state facilitates a lot of things just because of our geography, as well as our history. Right? We’re a pretty young state, we’re not a super old state.

Mike Jones:
And I think from a video standpoint, some of that actually can come through really simply and just get outside, right? If you’re a brand here in Arizona, leverage the amazing sunshine that you have. I mean, you got perfect lighting pretty much all year round. So for your outdoor shots, and that’s a huge benefit for a lot of companies, is just the lifestyle that people can have here. Right? If you’re at all outdoor, centered at all, this is a fantastic state to be in. And yeah, it’s okay. First parts of the state it’s really hot for a few months, but if it’s hot down here, I just go up to Flagstaff, two hour drive and I can be up on the mountain and I could be mountain biking and I could be hiking.

Mike Jones:
I could be just out walking around in the downtown, it’s so easy. So I think there’s some … I don’t know if I’m trying to answer your question, Chris, in a roundabout kind of way.

Chris Stadler:
The don’t tell me what to do, kind of attitude, it feels a little more like Wild West, like, “Look, I do my own thing, leave me alone.” And even the cactuses, if you look at cactuses, they just look like they’re flipping you off. They’re just like, “I don’t care. It’s hot. And you know what? I don’t care. I’m here anyway. I do what I do.” Right?

Mike Jones:
It always reminds me of the story of this guy, a coworker of mine, he rode a Harley every day. But not like your prototypical Harley rider. He’s a jazz drummer on the side. So he would like … weekends, he played with some jazz band and always wearing his jeans and the white shirt, kind of like 1950s style-

Chris Stadler:
Did he have cigarettes rolled up in the sleeves?

Mike Jones:
No cigarettes rolled up, but he would have the sleeves rolled up every once in a while. And I remember a friend of mine was really interested in riding a motorcycle. And he’s like, “Perry,” the guy’s name was Perry. He’s like, “Perry, you ride a bike every single day to the office. That’s awesome, dude. I’m really considering getting a bike, but how do you deal with the summer heat? How do you ride a bike, a motorcycle into work every single morning when it’s like 105, 110, 115 out?” And Perry just looks at him and he goes, “Dude, but you’re riding a motorcycle.” It’s just like, that was a quintessential, like, “Yeah, it’s hot, but I’m doing what I do, man.”

Chris Stadler:
Pictures of Perry, may be the answer to this question. Videos of Perry.

Mike Jones:
Yeah, maybe. So …

Chris Stadler:
Shoot Perry riding down the freeway.

Mike Jones:
I don’t know. But yeah, I mean, we’re a little more Wild West and we were certainly closer to our Wild West routes than a lot of states in terms of just history and stuff. I mean, we’re barely a hundred years old as a state. It’s crazy.

Chris Stadler:
Well, I mean, there’s some businesses that would appreciate that, right?

Mike Jones:
Yeah.

Chris Stadler:
I mean, businesses that do appreciate that. Tuft&Needle moved here for some reason. Right? I mean, they’re old news now, but I mean, right?

Mike Jones:
Yeah.

Chris Stadler:
California seems to be shedding businesses or at least that’s what I hear. There’s probably a reason, you know?

Mike Jones:
Yeah.

Chris Stadler:
And so I wonder, how would you capture that? So one of the things Skyler, we’ve been running into these conversations-

Mike Jones:
[crosstalk 00:41:33] … middle fingers, that’s how.

Chris Stadler:
It’s just like, “It’s cheaper. Cheaper.” Yeah, but can’t it also be a little better in some ways too? I mean, does it have to just be cheaper?

Skyler Irvine:
I think it’s both. I mean, you can live the lifestyle that most people only live on vacation here. Another thing, it does get really hot, but some states get snowed in and they can’t leave their house. And here it’s just uncomfortable until you get into somewhere where it’s freezing cold with air conditioning.

Mike Jones:
They don’t have to shovel sunshine here.

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah. And it’s true. And I’ve been in the Chicago in the summer where they’ll be like, “Hey, we’re going to barbecue this weekend if it doesn’t rain.” And it’s foreign to me, just be like, “What do you mean? You could just make plans where we’re from and never worry about the weather getting in the way.” And other states, everything is dependent on the weather and it’s just like, “What is that? It seems primitive almost, you haven’t controlled your weather. We only have one type of weather where we’re from.”

Mike Jones:
Get on the train guys.

Skyler Irvine:
[crosstalk 00:42:36]… on vacation to Seattle just so I can wear a coat that I bought two years ago. I know-

Mike Jones:
[crosstalk 00:42:41]. It has really gotten into the way there, let’s go somewhere. Where should we go, honey?

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah.

Mike Jones:
Well, let me look at my wardrobe and see what I haven’t worn in a while.

Skyler Irvine:
This has a tag on it-

Mike Jones:
Let’s go somewhere. I’ve got some snow shoes, nobody used.

Chris Stadler:
We know it’s going to be 110 in the summer. So I mean, the weather, it sort of dictates what we do, but it’s not hard because we know all summer. It’s just like, we’re probably not going to be going out, playing too much sports or whatever outside in the heat, you know? At noon.

Mike Jones:
Yeah. Unless you’re my children, they don’t care.

Chris Stadler:
They don’t care. Yeah.

Mike Jones:
They don’t care, which is something I never really thought about before I had kids.

Skyler Irvine:
And so they look up at you and they’re like, cheeks are red and they’re just like-

Mike Jones:
[crosstalk 00:43:22]… like tomatoes.

Chris Stadler:
And they’re not sweaty anymore, because they’re dehydrated. That’s ever happened. And they pass out in the middle of dinner.

Mike Jones:
Yeah.

Chris Stadler:
That’s horrible, Mike.

Mike Jones:
I don’t know. I keep going back to the open skies thing. I don’t know. I think that’s something really cool and unique about Arizona and it tells both that geographical story, but it also tells that more philosophical story of, the sky’s the limit here. Right? You want to do something, if you want to build something, if you want to create something new, there’s not really a lot that’s going to get in your way.

Chris Stadler:
Yeah.

Mike Jones:
And that’s really cool. I think that’s a really cool attribute and one that I hope people keep leaning into here, but …

Chris Stadler:
And the past guest, we had talked about how … he was from New York, and he was from here. Started a business in New York, came back, started a business here. And he was saying just about how, don’t think of it like cheap, think of it like this is a place where you come and everybody else is in, right? So you’re in New York. Competing is the best, biggest, best companies. But if you come here, you’re in an incubator, you’re able to compete with … Yeah I mean, there’s some good … We like a lot of the companies here. There’s some great companies here, but they’re not the biggest, most polished New York companies, that you have to now compete with on a shoestring budget. As a startup.

Skyler Irvine:
I think that’s a big part of it. The barriers of entry are a lot lower where, I moved out here and started buying houses, and the foreclosure crisis as in the real estate fixing and flipping, and something that wouldn’t even have been possible for me in California, where I was moving away from. There’s just too many restrictions for some, like a young person couldn’t do those things. Unless you came from wealth or you had access to a certain level of wealth where here, it was easier to take certain risks, and do things that wouldn’t have been possible in somewhere like New York or Los Angeles. And I think the same is true for a lot of different businesses, of just to be in business in New York, you’re looking at X amount of dollars of capital to do anything. Licensing and rent, and all that.

Skyler Irvine:
So if you’re able to go someplace that has most of the same features, like you could live in downtown Phoenix have access to a lot of different things, and be close to Phoenix airport, an international airport, go anywhere in the world. But doing it where you don’t have to waste money on things that aren’t as valuable, it creates the … now it’s just like the best of the best are going to win rather than, all right who’s the best of the best of the people that have access to certain things? And a lot of it depends on what your last name is, or who you know. And I think that’s what makes Arizona and Phoenix really interesting, is a lot of people, especially my generation and your generation, when I grew up everyone’s parents were from somewhere else. Everyone was from Chicago, from New York.

Skyler Irvine:
So there were a lot of local sports fans. And then me, it’s everyone I meet my age are Suns fans, Cardinals fans, Coyotes fans. And it’s the new first-generation that grew up in Arizona, has a chip on their shoulder, aren’t here so they can eventually move away is like, “I want to build my thing here, and make a name for myself.” And I think that’s cool, playing into that, that Westward expansion, moving out West, do it on your own, build it there, do it my way type of thing. And I think that’s really cool.

Chris Stadler:
And you can still see the Knicks and the Nets twice a year. Right? You’re downtown Phoenix. It’s just right there.

Skyler Irvine:
Not this year my friend, not this year.

Chris Stadler:
Used to be in Orlando for that, but …

Mike Jones:
Yeah, that’s a whole nother podcast right there.

Chris Stadler:
The NBA in COVID. Should we talk about the book a little bit?

Mike Jones:
Yeah, let’s talk about the book. Yeah. So-

Chris Stadler:
Niche, Please!

Mike Jones:
You gave us the quick and dirty version at the beginning, Skyler, but I’d love to dig a little bit more into that and where you’re heading with the book.

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah. Niche, Please! How to Narrow Your Focus and Grow Your Reach. And we touch on how your business can find a niche, how your marketing can find a niche and how your content can find a niche. And when you get to that point, you become not overwhelmed with every new technology advancement. You look at it as opportunity. A couple of things I try to drill down on is, there are people that I talk with who just throw social media into a category of, social media doesn’t work for us, or there’s too much social media, or we don’t have the time to do all that. And it’s like, well, what are you calling all of that? Is YouTube social media? Is Twitter, is Facebook? What are you saying specifically? And for some people it’s just overwhelming to really understand, but if you break it down in like, all right, the first TV commercials, we’re filming someone in a radio booth talking. Because they didn’t know how to use TV, but once you figure out how to use TV, well now commercials have their own style and feel and content.

Skyler Irvine:
And then when the internet comes around it’s like, “Well, let’s just take our commercials and put it on the internet.” But that doesn’t work. And it’s the same model. So the same thing happens when TikTok launches. It’s, “All right, let’s just take our best Instagram posts and put them on TikTok.” It’s like, no, it doesn’t work that way. And while that can be frustrating, it’s also amazing because it used to be, if you couldn’t afford to be promoting on the three channels that existed on television, you didn’t have a chance to compete ever. You had to go work for those companies. It’s the only thing you could do. Well, that doesn’t happen anymore.

Skyler Irvine:
Dollar Shave Club is going to have a video go viral and now compete with Gillette. Or Netflix can build an entire business model based on being the anti blockbuster and succeed, because of the internet. Or even something like Amazon, which today is the everything store, originally started out as being the bookstore that had every single book, because if you went to a bookstore and they didn’t have your book, you had to order it anyway and wait for it. Amazon was, “Well, we have every book ever. You just have to look for it.” And now it’s the everything store that’s doing a ton of different stuff. But all of those things happened because technology made that possible.

Skyler Irvine:
So if you’re a realtor in a city like Phoenix and you can’t compete because the guy ahead of you has bus benches and billboards and TV commercials. And you think like, “I have to outspend them.” No, you don’t. You could go be a big fish in a small pond and have the best YouTube channel. And it seems small potatoes, but there’s YouTube channels now that are making … I mean, the people that are making money in real estate using social media are in the tens of millions a year, this is athlete money we’re talking about. I don’t think a lot of people understand that, to where now the person that’s so used to spending money on content, spending it on newspaper ads and billboards and buses.

Skyler Irvine:
The second the market turns, they’ve got to cut their costs. And now if you’re not spending money on this marketing a month from now, it’s all taken down. It’s like you don’t exist anymore. The guy that’s been doing a video a week on his YouTube channel, he could take a year off and every one of those videos are still generating-

Chris Stadler:
They’re working for him.

Skyler Irvine:
… New business for him, still generating leads. And the exponential value of that is not only insane because it’s working full time, but it’s working while he’s sleeping, he doesn’t have to spend money on it tomorrow for it to work. And a lot of other stuff you do. And eventually that changes. Eventually, maybe have it changed or YouTube gets bought by TikTok and it’s a Chinese company. And then we ban it. Well, if you’re good at making videos and you know the success, it sucks that you might have to start over somewhere else.

Skyler Irvine:
But a lot of the skills that you developed by making videos, learning about the hashtags, learning about user behavior and what people want in content, and how quickly you should get into the value of it and cut your intro short. Well, that skillset transfers to other platforms. So if you break it down of like, “Okay, I’m great at writing, how can I utilize writing on these channels?” Well, you could show the process of writing on TikTok, and have a huge following in a very small niche, that could change your entire business model. And if there’s a new platform that comes out or puts you to rest, you get rid of the fear having to start all over. Because if you have a million followers on Instagram when you built that and it goes away, you wouldn’t really be starting over from scratch, going to another platform.

Skyler Irvine:
You have a skillset that is so unique and so valuable, that your star … It’s like if you stayed up all night writing an essay and your computer crashed, you have to write that essay over again. Yeah. You have to start over, but it’s really easy to write that essay the second time. Sometimes it’s even better because you can cut through some of the stuff you knew that wasn’t working, and you can do that in time. And I think that if you can look at social media and technology and digital media and your content that way, it really gets more into thinking, “Okay, what would be my niche? What would be my superpower that I could learn to develop and exploit?” And something like video is great, because you could turn into a lot of things, but video is not for everyone. So you were even seeing most podcasts now are content machines.

Skyler Irvine:
And I have more people that have told me, “I love your podcast.” And they’ve never listened to it. They’ve just seen Instagram clips of it. And that’s the only way they’ve ever consumed it. Because they just don’t listen to podcasts. Meanwhile, it was all built upon a podcast. So that’s what I look at as anyone could really do, whether or not you’re trying to build a large audience to sell a product to, or you’re a high end business that needs to find 10 clients that could hire you for annual agreements that you can make a lot of money on. Knowing how they’re spending their time, is really important and valuable because if you’re able to get their attention and keep their attention, you could do it at a lower cost than what it’s cost before. And you can create an entire business out of it.

Skyler Irvine:
You could change your business altogether. You can make the business that you want to be. Some people have a side hustle. That’s just a hobby for them. Great, here’s how to make your hobby better and more fun, and reach more people and grow your hobby. Or if you’re like, “I got laid off and my wife, we’ve lost our benefits and were furloughed. We don’t know what it’s going to take.” Well, you probably have a skillset that maybe you can launch an online course and you could do consulting. And if you’re able to utilize Zoom, you have an international audience that you can now sell to. You only need 10 people that could replace the entire salary that you lost. How do you do that? Well, instead of being overwhelmed by it being like, “Okay, well, here’s what I need to do.

Skyler Irvine:
Here’s how I can accomplish it.” So instead of looking at all of it like a giant pile that’s confusing, you could say, “Well, based on these needs, here’s what I should be doing.” And I think from there, that is such a huge starting point. Because the rest of it, you can learn along the way, and it’s constantly changing. You just have to put those systems in place of developing, what matters to you, stay focused on the things that matter, what happens too often, as you get a shiny object syndrome to where I’m going to do this on Instagram, because I want to double my sales. And then six months later you’ve doubled your sales, but your competitor has more likes on his post than you do. So you’re like, “Well, I want more likes on my posts.” All right, cool. You might get that.

Skyler Irvine:
But then you’re going to lose your sales because you’ve changed what you’re trying to do. And each of those have a different strategy, and you have to stay focused on those things. And I think a lot of people lose that vision of trying to keep up with the competition rather than, “Instead of me trying to compete with them, let me just do this thing that’s really easy for me to own and dominate. Because it’d be hard for other people to try to copy that.”

Mike Jones:
Yeah. I’m really excited about this book now.

Skyler Irvine:
I hope so.

Mike Jones:
You got me really excited.

Chris Stadler:
I know, it’s huge.

Skyler Irvine:
[crosstalk 00:54:51] … the book, the best part is we tell you how to pronounce niche.

Mike Jones:
Yeah.

Skyler Irvine:
We tell you, yeah-

Chris Stadler:
We have to read the book. The definitive answer is that way into the book.

Mike Jones:
[crosstalk 00:55:00]. So if people want to find out more about the book or about you Skyler or RenzlerMedia, where should they go? What’s some good places to send them?

Skyler Irvine:
Sign up for my newsletter. It’s probably the best. I do a weekly digital digest. That is a ton of valuable information to help you capitalize on the digital world and the latest social trends. Website is a great place to update on all the information that we’re doing, skylerirvine.com. But wherever you are in social media, I am too. And I’m easy to get a hold of.

Mike Jones:
Yeah. Just look for Skyler Irvine.

Skyler Irvine:
Yeah.

Mike Jones:
That’s awesome. And we’ll make sure those links are in the show notes. So if you go on our website, obviously azbrandcast.com, people can find all that information about Skyler, about what he’s doing, stuff he’s working on and definitely get signed up for his newsletter. And we are just about out of time. This has been fantastic Skyler. I know, because Sam pointed at me, our producer and was like, “Hey, we’re over an hour, man.” And I was like, “Really?-

Skyler Irvine:
We’re just getting started.

Mike Jones:
… how did that happen?”

Chris Stadler:
Where did the time go? I know.

Mike Jones:
We just got started. So we’re going to have to do a followup at some point.

Skyler Irvine:
I’d love to.

Mike Jones:
Yeah. So, thanks everybody for listening in on our show today. We thank you so much Skyler for coming on and just brain dumping, all of your knowledge and experience and expertise around social media and video, and content production.

Skyler Irvine:
Chris and Mike, I thank you. It does feel like a brain dump. I don’t get to talk to a lot of adults anymore. I’m stuck in quarantine with children. And I feel like I have so much to say, and I forget the social norms and how to do a lot of these things. So I appreciate you guys so much for having me on. I really want to thank you.

Mike Jones:
Yeah, absolutely. This is a great conversation. Just for all of our listeners, this is again, another episode of AZ Brandcast. If you want to find more of our episodes, you can obviously hop on almost any podcast directory, iTunes, Google play, Spotify. I think we’re even on Pandora now, which I’m excited about, because Pandora’s a thing I guess.

Chris Stadler:
Yeah.

Mike Jones:
I don’t know. But yeah, go check them all out and go to our website, azbrandcast.com. Definitely get on our newsletter there. That way you don’t miss a single episode. And I’m excited for the coming months as we’ve got some new guests lined up for September, October and on into the rest of the year. So we’re really excited for the rest of what’s coming. And as always, everyone don’t forget, you are remarkable.

Chris Stadler:
The AZ Brandcast is a project of Resound and is recorded in Tempe, Arizona with hosts Mike Jones and Chris Stadler. It’s produced and edited by Sam Pagel. Music is produced and provided by [fabric 00:57:40] an Arizona based music group. You can find us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, and at azbrandcast.com. If you’d like more episodes, subscribe on iTunes, Stitcher, Google play, or wherever you prefer to get your podcasts. To contact the show, find out more about AZ Brandcast or to join our newsletter list to make sure you never miss another episode, check out our website @azbrandcast.com. Copyright Resound Creative Media, LLC, 2020.